Vegetarian cuisine

The fork and spoon were introduced by King Chulalongkorn after his return from a tour of Europe in 1897 CE. In Latin America, dishes may be claimed or designated as a "plato nacional" although in many cases recipes transcend national borders with only minor variations. We think of all parts of the meal as a whole – sum rap Thai (the way Thais eat), is the term we use for the unique components that make up a characteristically Thai meal. The identification of Latin-American national dishes is stronger among expatriate communities in North America.[3] In Latin American countries, the plato nacional is usually part of the cuisine of rural and peasant communities, and not necessarily part of the everyday cuisine of city dwellers. Western influences, starting in 1511 CE when the first diplomatic mission from the Portuguese arrived at the court of Ayutthaya, have created dishes such as foi thong, the Thai adaptation of the Portuguese fios de ovos, and sangkhaya, where coconut milk replaces unavailable cow's milk in making a custard.[17] These dishes were said to have been brought to Thailand in the 17th century by Maria Guyomar de Pinha, a woman of mixed Japanese-Portuguese-Bengali ancestry who was born in Ayutthaya, and became the wife of Constantine Phaulkon, the Greek adviser of King Narai.

Thai cooking places emphasis on lightly prepared dishes with strong aromatic components and a spicy edge. Cucumber is sometimes eaten to cool the mouth with particularly spicy dishes. "princely rice").

Bami is made from egg and wheat flour and usually sold fresh. Stews of meat, plantains, and root vegetables are the platos nacionales of several countries in Central America, South America, and the Caribbean: Colombian ajiaco, and the sancocho of the Dominican Republic, Colombia, and Panama. Thai meals typically consist of rice (khao in Thai) with many complementary dishes shared by all. The identification of Latin-American national dishes is stronger among expatriate communities in North America.[3] In Latin American countries, the plato nacional is usually part of the cuisine of rural and peasant communities, and not necessarily part of the everyday cuisine of city dwellers. According to Thai food expert McDang, rice is the first and most important part of any meal, and the words for rice and food are the same: khao. Furthermore, because national dishes are so interwoven in a nation's sense of identity, strong emotions and conflicts can arise when trying to choose a country's national dish. Cucumber is sometimes eaten to cool the mouth with particularly spicy dishes. Thai food is known for its enthusiastic use of fresh (rather than dried) herbs and spices. When time is limited or when eating alone, single dishes, such as fried rice or noodle soups, are quick and filling.